Exercise and Healthy ageing

All of us have heard about exercise and how good it is for us. We know that we can improve our fitness and even reduce our weight. However, there is a lot more to exercise than we originally knew. Research into exercise has significantly increased in the past few years and we now understand that exercise has a wide variety of benefits for chronic diseases.

A common phrase I have heard is that “exercise is for young, fit and athletic people”. Research will tell you however that you are in fact incorrect. Exercise is now recommended as treatment for most health conditions and is also beneficial for preventing chronic diseases from occurring in the first place. 

Did you know that more than 70% of people that are aged above 65 have not one, but two or more chronic diseases such as cardiovascular (heart) disease, osteoarthritis, diabetes and cancer?1 Did you also know that exercise is extremely beneficial in the management and treatment of conditions such as2:

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Running shoe selection

Running biomechanics is an important topic for many runners because it is intricately linked to two of the most common questions in running. One being how can I improve performance and the other being how can I avoid injury? Good biomechanics can help to answer both of these questions, but what most runners are unaware of is the importance of correct footwear in achieving good biomechanics to help avoid injury.

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Exercise and osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is a condition that causes degeneration of the cartilage and bone in synovial joints. It most often occurs in load-bearing joints such as knees, hips, back, ankle and fingers1. Osteoarthritis is common in people aged between 45 to 90 years old and is more prevalent in women than men1. 

Osteoarthritis can cause inflammation of the tissue surrounding the joint, damage to the cartilage, bone spurs that grow around the joint and also cause deterioration of ligaments and tendons1. 

Symptoms of osteoarthritis can vary with each individual, however common symptoms can include pain within the joint and surrounding areas, joint stiffness and reduced range of motion and possibly swelling around the joint. 

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CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN AND EXERCISE AS A DRUG!

Chronic low back pain is the leading cause of disability worldwide! Acute low back pain is pain that lasts between 4-12 weeks, however chronic low back pain is defined as persisting pain the lower back for longer than 12 weeks. Non-specific low back pain is the most common cause. This can include age-related changes to the spine, such as spondylosis known as degeneration of the spine, herniated or ruptured discs, traumatic injuries, strains, tears in ligaments, tendons and muscles as well as other causes. Research shows that 15-20% of people with acute low back pain, will develop chronic low back pain, even after an initial tissue injury has healed. 

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Beautiful down syndrome (DS)

Research has shown that individuals with Down Syndrome have reduced cardiovascular fitness and strength (3). Strength and fitness are important factors to help us complete daily activities such as walking, dressing and carrying the groceries. Research has also shown individual’s with Down syndrome have a higher prevalence for obesity and metabolic disorders such as diabetes, placing them at higher risk for chronic diseases such as heart disease (4). Exercise is one fantastic way which can help to improve some of the complications associated with low muscle tone.

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Technology and the NDIS

Aevum is one of the biggest NDIS service provider for Physio and Exercise Physiology in the Sutherland Shire. We have many participants under the NDIS come from Sutherland, Miranda, Caringbah, Menai, Engadine and Cronulla. Our team are highly experienced to help you establish and achieve your goals. We work closely with many participants with multiple sclerosis (MS) in the Sutherland Shire and for this reason we have invested in advanced technology to help better equip our clinicians to achieve our participants goals. In this article we will discuss some of these.

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Aaron Babb
HAMSTRING TEARS IN RUNNERS AND SOCCER PLAYERS

Hamstring injuries are common in field sports like soccer within the Sutherland Shire and Helensburgh regions, or more specifically over 35 F grade soccer. The hamstrings are an incredibly powerful muscle group however generally don’t get stronger without a specific and target strength and conditioning program. With our day to day lives we use our quadriceps a lot and they can maintain reasonable strength through normal activities of daily living.

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ROTATOR CUFF SHOULDER INJURY

The rotator cuff muscles and rotator cuff tendons are an integral part of a normally functioning shoulder. Therefore it is no surprise that rotator cuff injuries including rotator cuff tears, rotator cuff tendonitis and subacromial bursitis can cause significant shoulder pain and dysfunction. Fortunately, your team at Aevum Physio in the Sutherland Shire and Helensburgh know a thing or two about fixing a rotator cuff injury.

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ANKLE SPRAINS AND RUNNING

In this blog we wanted to cover ankle sprains in a little more detail as they are something very common in trail running and field sports in the Sutherland Shire. We see these injuries every week at Aevum and the rehabilitation process is a key factor in not only returning to running or sport but also in assisting to limit future injury. For any further information call Aevum Physiotherapy on 85443231.

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FACTS ON RUNNING INJURIES

Running has one of the largest participation rates. Statistics from the Australian Sports Commission’s 2006 survey showed an estimated 1,224,100 Australians aged 15 years and older participated in running in the 12 months prior to being surveyed. Running is a popular fitness activity because of its health benefits, affordability and convenience. However running can cause injuries, often due to overtraining – people doing too much, too soon.

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Why is a bike fit important?

Most of us who cycle for fun would have thought cycling is an easy sport – just get on the bicycle, make sure it feels comfortable to sit on, then ride away. But things aren’t as easy as they look, because spending prolonged periods of time in a non-ideal cycling posture can result in injuries without you realising it, so today I’ll give you a run-down of what your body position should look like when you get on the bicycle.  

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Aaron Babb
Stretching before a run doesn't do anything!?!

It’s about time. I think the myth can finally be dispelled. I may get chased down the road with pitchfork carrying pre-exercise pro-stretching advocates but here I go. Stretching before exercise is about as useless in preventing injury as one of Hue Heffner’s new girlfriends trying to convince you she has no interest in money.

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Tear me another one - muscle tears and middle age soccer

Now that we are heading into winter the most common injury we will see in the clinic by far are muscle tears, the most common age group affected are over 35. Out of those, the most common presentation will be from soccer players and, out of them men who have a relatively sedentary job Monday to Friday are at the greatest risk.

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Heel pain in kids? What actually is sever's disease

This being that time of year when all parents sit around a table and someone say “Not long now”, everyone looks at each other with absolute exhaustion and yet sheer joy, acknowledging with the slightest facial expression what that comment is in reference too. That time being the kids that you love so much but really don’t like so much at the moment are heading back to the parent relief centre or school as it also known to those without kids. 

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Why is posture so important?

As a Physiotherapist I think bad posture is as worthwhile as a beer with Kim Jong-Il or as constructive as Phil Gould’s insights into a game of football. For the sake of this article I need to make a few generalisations, otherwise it will be incredibly long and somewhat boring to the likes of an old Kevin Costner movie and you wont make it to the end. 

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